Training

First Responders Recognize The Need To Understand Autism Better

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There are many communities and agencies nationwide that train their EMT, Paramedic and Emergency Service personnel about how to recognize and treat autistic patients.  As a former medic, I hope this training becomes mandatory, and is incorporated universally.  ’1 in 88′ doesn’t begin to scratch the surface; there are so many autistic adults in every community who are not factored into this equation. -Ed

HOWARD COUNTY FIRST RESPONDERS TO BE TRAINED TO BETTER SERVE THOSE WITH AUTISM

Autism

COLUMBIA, Md. – First responders in Howard County will get training designed to better equip them in an emergency situation as they work to meet the needs of those with autism.

In a press release issued Monday morning, it was announced the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services would be partnering with the Howard County Autism Society on a progressive training program to teach fire personnel and paramedics how to respond to emergencies involving individuals with autism.

The comprehensive training will be included in the department’s virtual academy and will be a requirement for all firefighters and paramedics. Organizers say it will include facts about autism, the characteristics of autism and tips for helping people with autism in emergency situations.

“As an organization, we are always striving to deliver the very best service to the entire community, including those with functional needs,” said fire/EMS chief William Goddard. “This new innovative training will be a great benefit to our personnel We are excited about this partnership.”

Part of the training will include an forum for feedback and questions in which parents of those with autism will be invited.

“Courses like this are critical to our development,” said captain Tony Concha. “As first responders, we want to be able to recognize and anticipate the unique aspects of interacting with members of our community. Joint training such as this, increases our awareness and comfort level when providing care during emergency responses.”

The training expands the efforts of the HCAS to better serve those with autism. Last spring, the HCAS launched a program with the 911 call center that give residents the option of placing a flag on their address, alerting responders of someone with autism at the home and may be unaware of danger, oversensitive or unresponsive.

http://www.abc2news.com/dpp/news/region/howard_county/howard-county-first-responders-to-be-trained-to-better-serve-those-with-autism#ixzz2DWnvMllW

The Business World’s New Geek Chic

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I don’t know if I necessarily agree with this premise despite the fact that I’m sure it happens.  While this article spells fairly good news to people with Asperger’s, ADHD and Dyslexia, it does nothing for those with plain ol’ Autism, PDD-NOS, etc.  This article may fly in the face of current conventional thinking that says 1 out of every 3 people diagnosed with Autism have “no paid job experience, college or technical schooling nearly seven years after high school graduation.”  Every business wants to find its ‘Rain Man‘; the savant who can sift through reams of mathematical data to find that one gold nugget to bring that particular business to the forefront.  Only 10% of the Autistic population have specials skills which range from “splinter skills” to “prodigious” savants. 

“Among the 10% of persons who are autistic, there is a wide spectrum of savant abilities. Most common are what are called ‘splinter skills’ such as obsessive preoccupation with and memorization of sports trivia, license plates, maps or things as obscure as vacuum cleaner motor sounds, for example. ‘Talented’ savants are those persons whose special skills and abilities are more specialized and highly honed making those skills obviously conspicuous when viewed over against over-all handicap. Finally there is a group of ‘prodigious’ savants whose skills are so spectacular they would be conspicuous even if they were to occur in a non-handicapped person. There are probably fewer than 50 persons living worldwide who would meet the high-threshold definition of prodigious savants, and approximately one-half of that group would be autistic savants.”

I guess I’m glad the business world is aware of the attributes that those with Asperger’s possess.  I only hope that when that proverbial gold nugget is found, the contributions of those on the Spectrum are duly recognized, with part of the bounty shared with the Autism community to further promote awareness, education and opportunity.-Ed

In Praise of Misfits

Why Business Needs People With Asperger’s Syndrome, Attention Deficit Disorder and Dyslexia

In 1956 William Whyte argued in his bestseller, “The Organisation Man”, that companies were so in love with “well-rounded” executives that they fought a “fight against genius”. Today many suffer from the opposite prejudice. Software firms gobble up anti-social geeks. Hedge funds hoover up equally oddball quants. Hollywood bends over backwards to accommodate the whims of creatives. And policymakers look to rule-breaking entrepreneurs to create jobs. Unlike the school playground, the marketplace is kind to misfits.

Recruiters have noticed that the mental qualities that make a good computer programmer resemble those that might get you diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome: an obsessive interest in narrow subjects; a passion for numbers, patterns and machines; an addiction to repetitive tasks; and a lack of sensitivity to social cues. Some joke that the internet was invented by and for people who are “on the spectrum”, as they put it in the Valley. Online, you can communicate without the ordeal of meeting people.

Wired magazine once called it “the Geek Syndrome”. Speaking of internet firms founded in the past decade, Peter Thiel, an early Facebook investor, told the New Yorker that: “The people who run them are sort of autistic.” Yishan Wong, an ex-Facebooker, wrote that Mark Zuckerberg, the founder, has “a touch of Asperger’s”, in that “he does not provide much active feedback or confirmation that he is listening to you.” Craig Newmark, the founder of Craigslist, says he finds the symptoms of Asperger’s “uncomfortably familiar” when he hears them listed.

Similar traits are common in the upper reaches of finance. The quants have taken over from the preppies. The hero of Michael Lewis’s book “The Big Short”, Michael Burry, a hedge-fund manager, is a loner who wrote a stockmarket blog as a hobby while he was studying to be a doctor. He attracted so much attention from money managers that he quit medicine to start his own hedge fund, Scion Capital. After noticing that there was something awry with the mortgage market, he made a killing betting that it would crash. “The one guy that I could trust in the middle of this crisis,” Mr Lewis told National Public Radio, “was this fellow with Asperger’s and a glass eye.”

Entrepreneurs also display a striking number of mental oddities. Julie Login of Cass Business School surveyed a group of entrepreneurs and found that 35% of them said that they suffered from dyslexia, compared with 10% of the population as a whole and 1% of professional managers. Prominent dyslexics include the founders of Ford, General Electric, IBM and IKEA, not to mention more recent successes such as Charles Schwab (the founder of a stockbroker), Richard Branson (the Virgin Group), John Chambers (Cisco) and Steve Jobs (Apple). There are many possible explanations for this. Dyslexics learn how to delegate tasks early (getting other people to do their homework, for example). They gravitate to activities that require few formal qualifications and demand little reading or writing.

Attention-deficit disorder (ADD) is another entrepreneur-friendly affliction: people who cannot focus on one thing for long can be disastrous employees but founts of new ideas. Some studies suggest that people with ADD are six times more likely than average to end up running their own businesses. David Neeleman, the founder of JetBlue, a budget airline, says: “My ADD brain naturally searches for better ways of doing things. With the disorganisation, procrastination, inability to focus and all the other bad things that come with ADD, there also come creativity and the ability to take risks.” Paul Orfalea, the founder of Kinko’s and a hotch-potch of businesses since, has both ADD and dyslexia. “I get bored easily; that is a great motivator,” he once said. “I think everybody should have dyslexia and ADD.”

Where does that leave the old-fashioned organisation man? He will do just fine. The more companies hire brilliant mavericks, the more they need sensible managers to keep the company grounded. Someone has to ensure that dull but necessary tasks are done. Someone has to charm customers (and perhaps lawmakers). This task is best done by those who don’t give the impression that they think normal people are stupid. (Sheryl Sandberg, Mr Zuckerberg’s deputy, does this rather well for Facebook.) Many start-ups are saved from disaster only by replacing the founders with professional managers. Those managers, of course, must learn to work with geeks.

Geekery in the genes

The clustering of people with unusual minds is causing new problems. People who work for brainy companies tend to marry other brainy people. Simon Baron-Cohen of Cambridge University argues that when two hyper-systematisers meet and mate, they are more likely to have children who suffer from Asperger’s or its more severe cousin, autism. He has shown that children in Eindhoven, a technology hub in the Netherlands, are two to four times more likely to be diagnosed with autism than children in two other Dutch towns of similar size. He has also shown that Cambridge students who study mathematics, physics and engineering are more likely to have autistic relatives than students studying English literature. Most employers are leery of hiring severely autistic people, but not all. Specialist People, a Danish firm, matches autistic workers with jobs that require a good memory or a high tolerance for repetition.

More broadly, the replacement of organisation man with disorganisation man is changing the balance of power. Those square pegs may not have an easy time in school. They may be mocked by jocks and ignored at parties. But these days no serious organisation can prosper without them. As Kiran Malhotra, a Silicon Valley networker, puts it: “It’s actually cool to be a geek.”

http://www.economist.com/node/21556230?iframe=true&width=100%&height=100%

http://www.wisconsinmedicalsociety.org/savant_syndrome/savant_articles/autistic_savant

http://beyondautismawareness.wordpress.com/2012/05/14/transitioning-autistic-young-adults-need-more-job-training/

A Road To Independence: From Autism Spectrum To Software Tester

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Photograph by Darren Robb/Photonica/Getty Images

 

Outsourcing to The Autistic Rather Than to India

By on March 27, 2012

Part of the reason autism has captivated Hollywood moviemakers more than other developmental disabilities is that, for all the difficulties it brings those who have it, it also gives some of them the ability to perform uncanny feats of brainpower: effortlessly memorizing train schedules or song lyrics, identifying the day of the week of any date in the past. Even among those who aren’t full-blown savants, many display an impressive ability, even a desire, to immerse themselves in what the rest of us would see as mind-numbingly boring, detail-oriented tasks.

What if we could turn that ability toward things besides memorizing train schedules? It’s not simply an abstract question: The vast majority of those with Asperger’s syndrome and high-functioning autism are unemployed. A few companies are trying to do just that, and all in the same sphere: software testing, the epitome of mind-numbing, detail-oriented work. The pioneer was a company called Specialisterne, started in 2004 by a Danish software engineer with an autistic son—it has since created offshoots in Iceland and Scotland. In 2008 a small nonprofit called Aspiritech in Chicago was started to put people with high-functioning autism and Asperger’s syndrome to work testing smartphone apps.

The newest entrant into the space in the U.S. is a Los Angeles-based software and design firm called Square One. The company has a small pilot program working to design a software-testing training program for people on the autism spectrum. The project grew out of conversations between company co-founder Chad Hahn and his wife, Shannon, who works with the developmentally disabled. Hahn, along with experts his wife led him to, has put together a software-testing curriculum that he’s now in the process of teaching to an inaugural class of three. The course he’s designed relies not on written instructions but on a software tool called iRise to create simulations of the sort of problems the trainees would confront in an actual work setting.

Hahn is also trying to develop a work environment that would be friendly to those on the autism spectrum, for whom the social interactions of a typical workplace can trigger paralyzing anxiety. For some people, Hahn says, that might mean ensuring that there’s a quiet room or a set of headphones they can put on to block out the buzz around them; for others it’s making sure there’s a counselor there to talk to whenever they need it. Hahn says he’s in talks with Warner Bros. and LegalZoom about software-testing contracts.

But what’s most original about Square One’s approach is how resolutely bottom-line-oriented Hahn is. Specialisterne only worked because of generous Danish subsidies for employing the developmentally disabled, and Aspiritech is a nonprofit. But for the time being Hahn is committed to the for-profit route.

A lot of software testing is done overseas by workers in India. The case Hahn makes is that his software testers will work for $15 to $20 an hour—pay comparable to, or even lower than, that of software testers in India, but right here in the U.S. After all, he points out, people with autism don’t have a lot of alternatives—when they do find work, it’s usually bagging groceries or sweeping hospital floors at the minimum wage.

Hahn, in other words, is proposing outsourcing to the developmentally disabled rather than the developing world. Asked whether it might be exploitative to pay people with a disability less than those without one for doing the same work, he says he doesn’t see it that way. For one thing, he says, Indian software testers aren’t exactly sweatshop labor; they make about $25 an hour. And if paying less makes the company able to hire the developmentally disabled in the first place, he doesn’t see a problem with it.

“I haven’t had one parent of an autistic child come to me and say this isn’t going to work,” he says. “They say, ‘This is a way for my child to make more money than they would have made otherwise, and allow them to be more independent.’ They worry, what is my child going to do when I’m gone? And this is kind of a way out.”

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2012-03-27/outsourcing-to-the-autistic-rather-than-to-india