Parenting

An Autism Job Board For Special Needs Job Seekers

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Autistic Teen Inspires Mom To Launch Online Job Board For Applicants With Special Needs

by Joseph Erbentraut, via The Huffington Post

When Atlanta-based attorney Shannon Nash and her husband first received the news that their 18-month-old son, Jason, was autistic, they felt overwhelmed and devastated.

The outlook for Jason painted by doctors and therapists alike was, Nash says, “a very bleak outcome in terms of what his future could be. Very, very bleak.” Her expectations, she says, were set very low when it came to what her son would be able to accomplish.

“Thank God they were wrong and that they just didn’t know,” she told The Huffington Post.

Now, Nash’s son is 16 years old. Though he will likely need to continue speech therapy for the rest of his life and has other struggles, he has made a lot of progress. His receptive language, she says, is excellent and she is currently considering sending him to a Minnesota-based program where he could earn an associate degree that will be of good use when he enters the workforce as an adult. It’s something she never would have anticipated when they first got the diagnosis.

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Shannon Nash with her son Jason, who helped inspire her to launch Autism Job Board, a new website for job seekers with autism spectrum disorder.

The time after high school, however, is when the obstacles typically heighten for youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Though the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in 68 U.S. children now have ASDs — a marked increase from the time Jason was diagnosed — employment opportunities for those children when they become adults (an estimated 500,000 will do so within the next decade in the U.S.) are frustratingly few.

According to a 2012 study from Washington University in St. Louis, just 55 percent of young adults with autism had a job over the course of the six years immediately following high school. And the chance of being unemployed or not continuing their education is more than 50 percent greater for young adults with autism compared to their peers with other disabilities. Their combined unemployment and underemployment rate is estimated at 90 percent nationwide.

Alarmed by those statistics, Nash began researching employment opportunities for youth with autism several years ago. Though she found helpful resources from advocacy groups like Autism Speaks on resume-writing and other job-seeking skills, what she couldn’t find was anything specifically bringing together applicants with autism and the employers willing and able to hire them.

“I thought surely my search terms were off or there was something wrong with me, but the more I looked, I found very little,” Nash told HuffPost.

Tired of hunting down something she was convinced already should have existed, she decided to do it herself. A serendipitous run-in with an employee of jobBoardASP — a company that specializes in building job board websites — helped her get a handle on the backend of such a website, while she focused on making connections with other organizations working on the issue. That work culminated recently in the website,Autism Job Board, being launched at the AutismOne conference in Rosemont, Illinois.

In addition to searchable job postings, the website will also feature information for employers on best practices for hiring and employing workers with ASDs, as well as tips and help for applicants. Registration is free.

The response thus far, Nash says, has been positive, though employers have been slow to take to the site. So far, just one job posting — for prep cook positions at a restaurant in Denver — can be found. Nash is currently focusing on ramping up efforts to urge more people — employers and job seekers alike — to sign up.

The effort is very personal for Nash, who has seen her son flourish as he’s volunteered with the veterinarian’s office where they take their family dog. Not long after Nash first asked the office if Jason could work there three or four hours a week, they were asking her to stay home and send her son on his own — for fear that her presence could actually hinder his progress.

“He loves it and I see a future for him there,” she said.

Nash hopes many others like her son will also be given the opportunity to excel in workplaces, gaining valuable experience they can build on as they get older. Though she believes there is a misconception among some employers that hiring a worker with autism will be more risk and liability than it is worth, she’s found the opposite to be true.

An organization called Actors for Autism is behind an innovative program based in Glendale, California, the Advanced Media Vocational Academy. The program offers training in several areas of the entertainment industry, including some areas that Nash says workers with autism are particularly well-suited for, such as film editing — a time-consuming, solitary process that many with autism might enjoy. The program is also involved in job placement. Other autism career programs in Plano, Texas, and Chicago offer similar training catering to other industries.

Beyond pushing for higher registration on the website, Nash hopes the Autism Job Board will eventually offer job fairs held throughout the country in order to bring together job seekers and local businesses with positions to fill in person. She is optimistic the employment outlook will improve for people like her son — though it may take some time.

“We want to educate people and make them understand this is a workforce to really get behind,” Nash said, “and I can tell you it’s going to happen because it’s too many kids aging into adulthood.”

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/02/autism-job-board_n_5418880.html

Long Time, No Write; or, Hey, I’m Still Here

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Hello all,

Sorry for not posting anything for a long time.  Besides being swamped with work (for a residential facility hellbent on moving institutionalized individuals into the community; will get into this in another post), they updated their network servers which now block my ability to blog at work (the nerve, right??).  It winds up being easier to post to the Beyond Autism Awareness Facebook page , or tweet links and stories on Twitter.  Like the rest of you, I am usually too busy or tired after work to post anything of value, or more likely than not, life in general just gets in the way. But that’s commonplace for families on the Spectrum, so I know you understand.

Sooo, what’s new on this end? Well just a few things, really.  Mike continued to learn new things in his Computer class given by the Nassau County PAL Special Needs Unit, and is continuing to make progress in school.  He had a successful season with his Farmingdale Splash friends that culminated in winning 2 medals at a Special Olympics swim meet.  He was really proud of himself, and of course, so were we.

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He also had 2 of his drawings featured at the Long Island Children’s Museum, alongside some of his peers.

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Last but not least, he wrote a short biographical piece that will be featured on The Golden Hat Foundation’s Blog page.

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All in all, it’s been a really hectic year so far, and I hope it continues; every step regardless of how small is always a step forward.

Peace to you all.  -Ed

Parents And Caregivers: We Need Your Input!

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Dear Parents, Caregivers and readers of Beyond Autism Awareness, please take a very brief (5-10min) survey about your views regarding your child’s Autism diagnosis, how it has impacted you and some of the methods you employ to cope.  This is a blind survey but does include a demographic section; feel free to modify dates, etc as you wish.  Understanding the impact that Autism has on you as a parent or caregiver is valuable and needs to be quantified.  Thank you in advance -Ed

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Scott Brown is in his senior year at SUNY Purchase studying Psychology. His area of interest is Autism and for his senior project he created a survey along with his faculty mentor (see description below). If you have a child diagnosed with Autism, Asperger’s, PDD-NOS, or another diagnosis on the Autism Spectrum, would you please take the time to fill out this survey.  Scott hopes to present his findings at a senior presentation in addition to graduating with his Bachelor’s degree on May 16!  Please forward to any other parents, guardians or caregivers you may know that would be willing to participate.   It is much appreciated.

The following link is for a research study investigating Coping Strategies and Advocacy in parents of children with Autism.  The survey will take about 10 minutes and it is our hope that the data will contribute to the research on Adaptive Coping Strategies for parents of children with Autism. Upon completion of the survey, please feel free to forward the link to any other parent who may be willing to fill out the survey.  Thank you for your participation.
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                      http://www.psychsurveys.org/sb/coping

A Christmas Miracle

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by Denis Hamill, via NY Daily News

Billy Nacmias weighs in at 168 pounds today (left) since checking into Center for Discovery in the Catskills at 280 pounds (right).

There could be no better Christmas gift than watching your son’s life be saved.

Jack Nacmias last appeared in this space when Hurricane Sandy rampaged and he foolishly tried to weather the storm with his family in Breezy Point, Queens.

But Jack had been used to having his own home wrecked.

He lived with his autistic teenage son, Billy, who had grown up as a mild-mannered boy lost in the bewildering maze of his affliction.

But as Billy reached full-muscled puberty, he was beaten by a teacher in now-defunct Beach Channel High School. Billy’s reaction was to eat uncontrollably until he hit 280 pounds. His anger grew in scary proportion.

“Some days, Billy would just suddenly go berserk and destroy the whole house,” Nacmias said. “The cops would have to come to restrain him. My wife and I would clean up the mess and weep. Not for ourselves. For him. For Billy. We didn’t know how to help him.”

Jack and his wife, Jane, loved Billy as much as their other kids, James and Danielle. But Billy had reached an age when keeping him at home was counterproductive to everyone’s quality of life — especially his own.

The Nacmiases sued the city.

As part of the settlement, the city offered to let them pick an institution of their choosing to try to rectify the harm done to Billy. The Nacmiases searched for the right place, where experts might rechannel Billy’s rage.

A few days after Thanksgiving, I stopped by the Nacmias and Son Sunoco station on Coney Island Ave. for my six-month tuneup. The usually jaded Jack Nacmias was a bouquet of smiles. I asked for the same high-octane gas he was on.

Billy Nacmias as Scrooge in 'A Christmas Carol,' a role which contributed to the discipline that led to his dramatic weight loss.

Billy Nacmias as Scrooge in ‘A Christmas Carol,’ a role which contributed to the discipline that led to his dramatic weight loss.

“I believe in miracles,” he said. “My son Billy has been saved.”

Nacmias started talking as fast as a tobacco auctioneer. Billy had been placed in the Center for Discovery in the Catskills. He said professionals there had transformed his overweight, unhappy, often violent son into a trim, joyful and productive young man.

Jack whipped out remarkable before-and-after photos.

“When we visited him, Billy rushed out and hugged us and proudly showed us the house he shared with four other kids on this 1,000- acre paradise,” Jack said. “There’s a full-time nurse, all kinds of dedicated counselors, and he works with egg production in the henhouse, with horses and sheep. He dropped from 280 pounds to 168 pounds, and he’s the trail leader on team hikes. He’s also studying drama to play Scrooge in ‘A Christmas Carol.’ ”

Jack is a grizzled Brooklyn grease monkey, not prone to sappy displays of emotion. But as he talked about his son, he wiped a damp eye. “On Thanksgiving, we took Billy to my cousin’s house and he ate with perfect table manners, using a knife and fork,” Jack says. “Billy ate responsibly, and when he was done, he asked if he could be excused.”

Billy Nacmias found a passion for the stage — among other things — at the Center for Discovery in the Catskills.

 Billy Nacmias found a passion for the stage — among other things — at the Center for Discovery in the Catskills.

Nacmias said the Center for Discovery is equipped with state-of-the-art technology and programs for autistic kids like Billy.

“The Center for Discovery uses a holistic approach,” says spokesman Loren Riegelhaupt. “All the food the students eat here is organic, farm fresh. They also work. As they lose weight and detoxify from chemical additives, they tend to calm down and sleep much, much better and act out less. They also can focus and learn more. In his 18 months here, Billy has gone through an astounding transformation. We’re thrilled with his success.”

Nacmias is thrilled, too.

“Listen, I use tools, parts, and labor to make a car run,” he says. “But these people have tools and counselors to perform human miracles. They have given my son Billy a life and given my family more happiness than you could ever know.”

The only sad part of the story is that Billy will soon reach the age of 21, when he must transfer out of the center.

“But his progress has been so remarkable that the counselors are trying to see if they can actually hire him to work with new kids like he was when he first arrived,” his dad says. “If they can, he’ll have his place in life.”

On Wednesday, Jack and his family drove up to see Billy in “A Christmas Carol.”

“I’m a Jew,” said Jack. “But here’s my son Billy, who used to wreck the house, memorizing lines and performing in the greatest Christmas story ever written. When I saw him playing Scrooge on stage, I was in tears with pride. It was the greatest gift our family has ever received. Billy has found meaning in life. Now I understand what Tiny Tim means when he says, ‘God bless us, everyone.’ ”

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/brooklyn/brooklyn-son-saved-scrooge-article-1.1553428

It’s That Time Of The Year Again

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As if any of us needed reminders of why we do what we do, and do so without batting an eyelash…  

AutismSpeaks

A Walk in My Shoes    
C. Waeltermann, 2007

Twas the Night Before Christmas
And all through the house
The creatures were stirring
Yes, even the mouse

We tried melatonin
And gave a hot bath
But the holiday jitters
They always distract

The children were finally
All nestled in bed
When nightmares of terror
Ran through my OWN head

Did I get the right gift?
The right color and style?
Would there be a tantrum
Or even, maybe, a smile?

Our relatives come
But they don’t understand
The pleasure he gets
Just from flapping his hands.

“He needs discipline,” they say
“Just a well-needed smack,
You must learn to parent..”
And on goes the attack

We smile and nod
Because we know deep inside
The argument is moot
Let them all take a side

We know what it’s like
To live with the spectrum
The struggles and triumphs
Achievements, regressions….

But what they don’t know
And what they don’t see
Is the joy that we feel
Over simplicity.

He said “hello”!
He ate something green!
He told his first lie!
He did not cause a scene!

He peed on the potty!
Who cares if he’s ten;
He stopped saying the same thing
Again and again!

Others don’t realize
Just how we can cope
How we bravely hang on
At the end of our rope

But what they don’t see
Is the joy we can’t hide
When our children with autism
Make the tiniest stride

We may look at others
Without the problems we face
With jealousy, hatred
Or even distaste,

But what they don’t know
Nor sometimes do we
Is that children with autism
Bring simplicity.

We don’t get excited
Over expensive things
We jump for joy
With the progress work brings

Children with autism
Try hard every day
That they make us proud
More than words can say.

They work even harder
Than you or I
To achieve something small
To reach a star in the sky

So to those who don’t get it
Or can’t get a clue
Take a walk in my shoes
And I’ll assure you…

That even 10 minutes
Into the walk
You’ll look at me
With respect, even shock.

You will realize
What it is I go through
And the next time you judge
I can assure you

That you won’t say a thing
You’ll be quiet and learn,
Like the years that I did
When the tables were turned.

An Unbelievable Number Of Idiots Contributed To This Travesty

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Iowa parents defend bullying of autistic teen

 

Local parents have defended the bullying of a 13-year-old with Autism (WhoTV.com)

A 13-year-old autistic boy has been punched, teased and had his condition mocked in online videos by his peers. But the parents of the accused children say they were justified in bullying the Iowa teen.On Monday, WhoTV.com ran a story about how the classmates of Levi Null had posted a video online showing Null suffering from symptoms of Asperger syndrome, a form of autism. In the video, classmates taunt Null, and teachers in the classroom appear to turn a blind eye to the behavior.

However, the station says that after airing the story, it actually received more than 100 emails from parents, shockingly with many of them defending the bullying at Melcher-Dallas High School, saying the child brings it on himself.

“I would say three-fourths of this stuff he brings on himself and probably a fourth of it is bullying that shouldn’t be going on,” said Levi Weatherly, father of the teen accused of posting the video online.

The school’s principal wrote Null’s mother an email saying the behavior documented in the video does not amount to bullying. Nonetheless, two of the students were disciplined and the video was reportedly deleted.

In a video interview with the station, Principal Josh Ehn actually said it is the students’ responsibility to handle cases of bullying. “We try our best to educate our staff, to educate our students to react to the cases, to investigate the cases we have,” Ehn said. “But ultimately, it’s got to come down to the kids to take ownership for this and to stand up for the kids who can’t stand up for themselves.”

The principal’s decision was defended by School Board President Bob Lepley, who told the station, “I stand by our principal. … According to his investigation I’ll have to stand by him.”

So why would the principal, the school board president and a number of parents defend the alleged bullying?

“He called my nephew a nasty name, and my nephew Cole cocked (sic) him in the mouth,” resident Jamie Harrison wrote to the station. “I’m proud of my nephew for doing that.”

“This kid has done things to get people mad that I think he could probably control,” added resident Nate Goof.

Levi’s mother, Dawn Simmons, says that she herself has even been targeted by some of the parents since complaining to the school about the video.

“It’s been a very frustrating day for all of us,” she said.

However, Simmons told the station that two of the students have since apologized to Levi, saying they didn’t realize how their actions had affected him.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/iowa-town-defends-bullying-of-autistic-teen-203249332.html

Sportsmanship And Selflessness Are The Real Trophies Displayed By A Winner

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WINNING ATHLETE GIVES HIS MEDAL TO TEEN WRESTLER WITH AUTISM

Click on this link to view the video:  http://www.myfoxdfw.com/story/24016357/winning-athlete-gives-medal-to-teen-wrestler-with-autism?autoStart=true&topVideoCatNo=default&clipId=9548848

In high school sports, medals are coveted tokens of accomplishment and symbols of sweat and strength.

Some were given out at Tuesday night’s meet between Frisco’s Wakeland High School and Flower Mound High School, but one young athlete wears a medal given to him by a selfless champion.

Alex Chappell, 15, loves wrestling more than anything. With anticipation, he watches each takedown, waiting for his chance on the mat.

He competes for the Frisco Wakeland High School junior varsity team.

Chappell was diagnosed with severe autism at age 8, and has only competed in the Special Olympics – until last Friday.

That was when his very first meet took place, in a 16-team tournament at J.J. Pearce High School. Chappell got pinned, losing both matches.

“I asked him how he did, and he said he lost out 0-2, and he was really bummed,” said Chris North, a junior at Northwest High School. “He was just sitting there playing with some cups by himself.”

North and Chappell’s paths crossed at the tournament, when their teams were seated next to each other.

“We were standing in front of the brackets, and he asked me if I could help him find his name, so I told him where he would be and what he’d be coming up to,” said North.

Hours later, North had won his four matches and earned a silver medal. Then, he did something remarkable.

“I walked around the gym and I had to find his team, and I found him sitting by himself, and I put the medal around his neck and I told him, “I won this for you, buddy,” said North.

That medal has barely come off of Chappell since.

“I want to say thank you,” said Chappell. “I love it.”

Chappell’s mom, Sharon Segura, didn’t learn of the story behind the medal until she read an email from his coach Monday night. His words brought her to tears.

“He tries so hard to be accepted, and for this kid to see him as a person, and not for his disability, makes me so proud,” she said.

It may seem like a small gesture, but it changed Chappell’s life.

“He looked like a winner,” said North. “He looked like a really nice kid who deserved a medal, and he deserved to feel like he won.”

What’s even more impressive is that North only told one person about his gesture.

He asked a teammate what he thought of the idea before he did it, and the teammate said absolutely.

Not even North’s coach knew until the next day.

Both coaches and parents hope other kids will see North’s selflessness and pay it forward.

 

http://www.myfoxdfw.com/story/24016357/winning-athlete-gives-medal-to-teen-wrestler-with-autism